Science Hubb update: Designs, facebook pages and being published! Yay!

This post is just on a few things I thought I’d update you with about what been going on lately with Science Hubb. First up, and least consequential, I made a new logo and header things for the site, which you can see above. I struggled for a while trying to thing of designs that felt appropriate and then actually designing it – procrasta-designing? –  but am fairly happy with it now. What do you think? Does it bring together the idea of different areas of science in a ‘hub’ (or circle, as the case may be…)? Some of the elements are supposed to represent subjects from earlier posts like the Bar-headed goose and whale.

Waking the (Tiny) giant…

Nestled safely away within your cells, among your DNA, lies something…foreign. An invader. Something you weren’t born with, hidden, evading your immune system and waiting to make its next strike: a ‘latent’ virus. In all probability, there are armies of different viruses performing this same trick throughout your body. Remaining silent; some of their own mysterious accord, others kept in check by your immune system or by random mutations, rendering them useless. Now researchers at The Ohio State University and the University of Oxford have worked out how some of these viruses can reactivate in healthy people, and once again go about their nefarious mindless deeds: hijacking our cells machinery, producing more of their own kind, and causing disease. An inefficient virus kills its host. A clever virus stays with it. — James Lovelock In healthy people latent viruses aren’t generally a problem, occasionally annoying, but rarely life threatening. However, ...(Read More)

Cholera’s Spring Loaded Nano-dagger

Bacteria have a number of tools to fend off foes or attack competitors, but now a new method can be added to the list: a spring-loaded dagger Research published in Nature by scientists at the Harvard Medical School and the California Institute of Technology investigated the structure of a mechanism used by the bacteria vibrio cholera to kill both competing bacteria and human cells, called the Type VI Secretary System (T6SS) in the cholera bacterium. It’s known that T6SS can deliver toxic proteins into nearby cells, but until now the exact mechanism was not known; now it appears T6SS could be using a poison tipped dagger to deliver this killing blow. “People aren’t surprised that animals have really interesting ways to hurt each other – snakes have venom, bears have claws,” says Grant Jensen, professor of biology at Caltech and co-leader of the study. “But they might be surprised that ...(Read More)